U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) – Enhanced Security Plan Sets Best Practices for Use of Cloud Services for Sensitive Data

2018/04/04

By:  Pablo LeCour, Partner, plecour@deloitte.co.uk; Tina Carlile, Senior Manager, ticarlile@deloitte.co.uk; and Ziyu Chin, Senior Consultant, ziyu.chin@deloitte.co.uk. All of Deloitte.

In December 2017 a global software company serving the telecommunications industry settled charges with the U.S. Department of Justice for violating U.S. controls on foreign access to sensitive data, including export controlled information. As part of the settlement, the company agreed to implement an Enhanced Security Plan designed to increase information security by regulating remote access to company networks and transfers of sensitive data.

The Enhanced Security Plan is a helpful benchmark for network providers seeking to protect sensitive information about U.S. telecommunications networks and other critical infrastructure.

Many tech companies develop software using foreign technical personnel both inside and outside of the U.S. The use of a global technical workforce increases the risk of unauthorized access to U.S. controlled information, including sensitive network data and data critical to the U.S. domestic communications infrastructure. Unauthorized access has consequences from an export controls perspective – under the U.S. Export Administration Regulations (EAR) and U.S. International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) licenses might be required to store U.S. sensitive data in overseas servers or for non-U.S. persons to handle, transmit or access controlled software, technology or technical data that is subject to U.S. jurisdiction. The Enhanced Security Plan provides an example of how these information security requirements can be met by:

  • Requiring authentication and tracking of changes to systems software through code-signing and other means;
  • Restricting access, transmission and storage of certain sensitive data to U.S.-based servers and U.S.-based network infrastructure; and
  • Controlling access by non-U.S. persons and implementing procedures for the proper vetting and licensing of non-U.S. employees and agents.
  • Additionally, the Enhanced Security Plan recommends an effective compliance program that includes the following:
  • Appointing a Security Director with appropriate authority, reporting lines, independence, skills, and resources to ensure compliance;
  • Implementing a Security Policy that describes the management of user identity and access, and building systems that monitor unauthorized attempts to access and screen personnel;
  • Conducting periodic third-party audits of the security procedures and their implementation; and
  • Engaging a third-party auditor to ensure compliance.

Companies doing business with the U.S. government or in connection with critical U.S. infrastructure, as well as companies that handle or use export-controlled technology, software, technical data, and cloud or network services, should review the DOJ Enhanced Security Plan requirements and consider including them within their own compliance programs.


Treasury/OFAC Amends and Reissues North Korea Sanctions Regulations

2018/04/04

(Source: Treasury/OFAC)

The Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) is announcing the amendment and reissuance in its entirety of the North Korea Sanctions Regulations, 31 C.F.R. part 510, in order to implement Executive Order (E.O.) 13687, E.O. 13722, and E.O. 13810, and to reference the North Korea Sanctions and Policy Enhancement Act of 2016 and the Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act of 2017.  Pursuant to these authorities, all property and interests in property of the Government of North Korea and the Workers’ Party of Korea are blocked, and U.S. persons are generally prohibited from engaging in transactions with them without authorization from OFAC and must block property or interests in property that are in, or come within, the United States or the possession of a U.S. person.  In addition, these authorities provide the Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Secretary of State, additional tools to disrupt North Korea’s ability to fund its weapons of mass destruction and ballistic missile programs.  OFAC is also publishing new and updated North Korea-related FAQs.

The Regulations and the FAQs emphasize that all U.S. persons must comply with OFAC regulations, including all U.S. citizens and permanent resident aliens regardless of where they are located, all individuals and entities within the United States, and all U.S.-incorporated entities and their foreign branches.  Furthermore, all transactions within the United States, including all financial transactions that transit the U.S. financial system, must comply with OFAC regulations.  For additional information, see FAQ 11 and 31 C.F.R. part 510, subpart G.

Violations of the North Korea Sanctions Regulations, issued under the authority of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act, 50 U.S.C. §§ 1701-06 (IEEPA), and other statutes can result in substantial civil monetary penalties, referral for criminal prosecution, or both.  Each violation of the North Korea Sanctions Regulations is subject to a civil monetary penalty of up to the greater of the IEEPA statutory maximum ($289,238 as of March 1, 2018) or twice the value of the underlying transaction.  Criminal penalties of IEEPA can reach $1,000,000 and 20 years imprisonment per violation.  For additional information, see FAQ 12 and 31 C.F.R. part 510, subpart G.

For additional information regarding OFAC’s prohibitions and penalties, see Basic Information on OFAC and Sanctions.

The regulations will be published in the Federal Register, and the changes will take effect, on: March 5, 2018.

Further information about the North Korea sanctions may be found here


Tips on How to Resolve AES Fatal Errors

2018/04/04

(Source: census@subscriptions.census.gov)

When a shipment is filed to the AES, a system response message is generated and indicates whether the shipment has been accepted or rejected. If the shipment is accepted, the AES filer receives an Internal Transaction Number (ITN) as confirmation. However, if the shipment is rejected, a Fatal Error notification is received.

To help you resolve AES Fatal Errors, here are some tips on how to correct the most frequent errors that were generated in AES for this month.

Fatal Error Response Code: 138

  • Narrative: Port of Unlading Missing
  • Reason: The Port of Unlading Code is missing. All vessel shipments, and any air shipments between the United States and Puerto Rico must provide a Port of Unlading Code.
  • Resolution: The Port of Unlading Code is the foreign port where the exported merchandise is unloaded from the exporting carrier. Report a valid Port of Unlading Code for all vessel shipments, and any air shipments between the United States and Puerto Rico. Verify the Port of Unlading Code, correct the shipment and resubmit.

Fatal Error Response Code: 561

  • Narrative: DDTC License Number Unknown
  • Reason: The License Code/ License Exemption Code reported requires a Department of State/ Directorate of Defense Trade Controls (DDTC) license number, but the DDTC license number reported is unknown in AES.
  • Resolution: The DDTC license number reported must be valid in AES. Verify the DDTC license number, correct the shipment and resubmit.   For further assistance, contact the licensing agency. The Department of State/ Directorate of Defense Trade Controls / DDTC Help Desk can be reached on 202-663-2838.

For a complete list of Fatal Error Response Codes, their reasons, and resolutions, see Appendix A – Commodity Filing Response Messages.

It is important that AES filers correct Fatal Errors as soon as they are received in order to comply with the Foreign Trade Regulations. These errors must be corrected prior to export for shipments filed predeparture and as soon as possible for shipments filed postdeparture but not later than five calendar days after departure.

For further information or questions, contact the U.S. Census Bureau’s Data Collection Branch


State/DDTC Reminder: DTrade Super Users Need to Update their Email Address in the System

2018/04/04

(Source: State/DDTC)

DTrade Super users should ensure their email address in DTrade is accurate and correct. Please log in to DTrade and verify your email address. To change or update your DTrade email address, follow these instructions: Update Your DTrade Email Address Instruction Form.


Trilogy International Associates, Inc. and William Michael Johnson Each Receives $100,000 Civil Penalty for Export Violations

2018/04/04

By: Ashleigh Foor

On or about January 23, 2010, April 6, 2010, and May 14, 2010, Trilogy International Associates, Inc., of Altaville, CA exported an explosives detector and a total of 115 analog-to-digital converters to Russia. These items are subject to the EAR and controlled on national security grounds. The items were classified under Export Control Classification Numbers 1A004 and 3A001, respectively, and valued in total at approximately $76,035. Each of the items required a license for export to Russia pursuant to Section 742.4 of the EAR.

Between, on, or about January 20, 2010 and May 14, 2010, William Michael Johnson of Angels Camp, CA, caused, aided, and/or abetted three violations of the EAR, specifically three exports from the United States to Russia of items subject to the EAR without the required BIS export licenses.

Charges include:

  • Three Charges of 15 C.F.R. § 764.2(a) – Engaging in Prohibited Conduct
  • Three charges of 15 C.F.R. § 764.2(b) – Causing, Aiding, or Abetting a Violation

Penalty:

  • Civil penalty of $100,000 against Trilogy International Associates, Inc.
  • Civil penalty of $100,000 against William Michael Johnson
  • Debarred: Both Trilogy International Associates, Inc. and William Michael Johnson are denied export privileges for a period of 10 years from the date of this Order, until 26 February 2028.

Date of Order: 26 February 2018


Company Pays $1,220,400 for 37 Violations of the Iranian Transactions and Sanctions Regulations

2018/02/08

The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) announced in December 2017, a $1,220,400 settlement with DENTSPLY SIRONA INC. (DSI), a US company with the successor in interest to DENTSPLY International Inc. (“DII” and, together with DSI, “DENTSPLY”) to settle a potential civil liability for 37 apparent violations of § 560.204 of the Iranian Transactions and Sanctions Regulations, 31 C.F.R. Part 560 (ITSR).

Around November 26, 2009 and July 5, 2012, DII subsidiaries UK International (“UKI”) and DS Healthcare Inc. (d.b.a. Sultan Healthcare), (“Sultan”), exported 37 shipments of dental equipment and supplies from the US, directly or indirectly to Iran, to distributors in third-countries, with knowledge or reason to know that the goods were ultimately destined for Iran.  OFAC determined that DII did not voluntarily disclose the apparent violations and that the apparent violations constitute a non-egregious case.

Full Details: https://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/sanctions/OFAC-Enforcement/Pages/20171206.aspx


BIS Publishes Clarifications to the Export Administration Regulations for the Use of License Exceptions

2018/02/08

Source: Federal Register

The goal of this final rule is to provide guidance based on existing agency understanding and practice on the use of License Exception GOV and STA. Specifically, this final rule makes three clarifications to License Exception Governments, International Organizations, International Inspections under the Chemical Weapons Convention, and the International Space Station (GOV) and adds five notes, along with making other minor clarifications, to License Exception Strategic Trade Authorization (STA).

Changes are as follows:

PART 740

Section 740.11 is amended:

  1. By revising paragraph (b)(2)(ii);
  2. By revising the introductory text of paragraph (b)(2)(iii)(C);
  3. By adding Note 1 to paragraph (b)(2)(iii)(C); and
  4. By adding Note 1 to paragraph (c)(1) to read as follows:
  • 740.11 Governments, International Organizations, International Inspections under the Chemical Weapons Convention, and the International Space Station (GOV).

* * * * *

(b) * * *

(2) * * *

(ii) Exports, reexports, and transfers (in-country) made by or consigned to a department or agency of the U.S. Government. This paragraph authorizes exports, reexports, and transfers of items when made by or consigned to a department or agency of the U.S. Government solely for its official use or for carrying out any U.S. Government program with foreign governments or international organizations that is authorized by law and subject to control by the President by other means. This paragraph does not authorize a department or agency of the U.S. Government to make any export, reexport, or transfer that is otherwise prohibited by other administrative provisions or by statute. Contractor support personnel of a department or agency of the U.S. Government are eligible for this authorization when in the performance of their duties pursuant to the applicable contract or other official duties. ‘Contractor support personnel’ for the purpose of this provision means those persons who provide administrative, managerial, scientific or technical support under contract to a U.S. Government department or agency (e.g., contractor employees of Federally Funded Research Facilities or Systems Engineering and Technical Assistance contractors). The term ‘contractor support personnel’ for purposes of this paragraph (b)(2)(ii) is limited to those individuals who are providing such support within a U.S. Government owned or operated facility or under the direct supervision of a U.S. government employee (i.e., an individual directly employed by the U.S. Government). Private security contractors are not ‘contractor support personnel’ for purposes of this paragraph (b)(2)(ii) because although they may work within a U.S. Government owned or operated facility, such contractors do not provide administrative, managerial, scientific or technical support under contract to the U.S. Government. This authorization is not available when a department or agency of the U.S. Government acts as a transmittal agent on behalf of a non- U.S. Government person, either as a convenience or in satisfaction of security requirements.

(iii) * * *

(C) This paragraph authorizes the ‘temporary’ export, reexport, or transfer (in-country) of an item in support of any foreign assistance or sales program authorized by law and subject to the control of the President by other means, when:

* * * * *

Note 1 to paragraph (b)(2)(iii)(C): ‘Temporary,’ for purposes of paragraph (b)(2)(iii)(C) of this section, means that four years from the date of an item’s initial export, reexport, or transfer (in-country), it must be returned to the exporter, reexporter, or transferor or its disposition otherwise authorized (e.g., pursuant to a license or another license exception) in accordance with the EAR.

* * * * *

(c) * * *

(1) * * *

Note 1 to paragraph (c)(1):

Civil intergovernmental organizations (such as the European Space Agency (ESA)) where the membership is limited to national governments that are ‘cooperating governments’ are also considered ‘cooperating governments’ for purposes of paragraph (c)(1) of this section. If the membership of the civil intergovernmental organization includes any national governments or other organizations that are not ‘cooperating governments,’ such civil intergovernmental organizations are not considered ‘cooperating governments’ for purposes of paragraph (c)(1) of this section. For example, civil intergovernmental organizations such as the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), the United Nations, and the World Bank do not fall within paragraph (c)(1) of this section because their membership includes governments that are not ‘cooperating governments.’

* * * * *

Section 740.20 is amended:

  1. By adding Note 1 to paragraph (a);
  2. By adding Note 1 to paragraphs (b)(2) and (b)(3) at the end of paragraph (b)(3);
  3. By revising paragraphs (d)(1)(i) and (d)(1)(ii);
  4. By revising paragraph (d)(2); and
  5. By adding Note 1 to paragraph (d)(3) to read as follows:
  • 740.20 License Exception Strategic Trade Authorization (STA).

* * * * *

(a) * * *

Note 1 to paragraph (a): License Exception STA authorizes transfers (in-country) but is only needed to authorize a transfer (in- country) when an EAR authorization is required. If a transfer (in-country) is not being made under STA, the requirements specified in this section do not apply (see Note 1 to paragraphs (b)(2) and (b)(3) of this section for requirements specific to staying within the scope of the original License Exception STA authorization and the concept of ‘completing the chain’ for purposes of ‘‘600 series’’ items originally authorized under License Exception STA).

(b) * * *

(3) * * *

Note 1 to paragraphs (b)(2) and (b)(3): Any export, reexport, or transfer (in-country) originally authorized under License Exception STA must stay within the scope of the original authorization. For example, for ‘‘600 series’’ items authorized under License Exception STA, such items must be provided to an eligible ultimate end user, such as a Country Group A:5 military, to stay in compliance with the original authorization. This requirement for the ‘‘600 series’’ is referred to as ‘completing the chain,’ meaning regardless of how many times the ‘‘600 series’’ item is transferred (in-country) or whether the ‘‘600 series’’ item is incorporated into higher level assemblies or other items, the ‘‘600 series’’ item must ultimately be provided to an eligible ultimate end user, or be otherwise authorized under the EAR. This applies regardless of whether the ‘‘600 series’’ item has been incorporated into a foreign-made item that may no longer be ‘‘subject to the EAR.’’ Because the other items eligible for authorization under License Exception STA (9×515 and other non-600 series ECCNs) do not include the ‘‘600 series’’ requirements specific to ultimate end user, this ‘completing the chain’ concept does not apply to 9×515 and other non-600 series ECCNs authorized under License Exception STA. However, the original export, reexport, or transfer (in-country) made under License Exception STA for 9×515 and other non-600 series ECCNs still must comply with the original authorization—meaning the terms and conditions of License Exception STA.

* * * * *

(d) Conditions—(1) Requirement to furnish Export Control Classification Number.

(i) The exporter must furnish to the consignee the ECCN of each item to be exported pursuant to this section. Once furnished to a particular consignee, the ECCN that applies to any item need not be refurnished to that consignee at the time the same exporter makes an additional export of the same item, if the information remains accurate at the time of the additional export.

(ii) A reexporter or transferor must furnish to subsequent consignees the ECCN, provided by the exporter or a prior reexporter or transferor, of each item to be reexported or transferred (in- country) pursuant to this section. Once furnished to a particular consignee, the ECCN that applies to any item need not be refurnished to that consignee at the time the same reexporter or transferor makes an additional reexport or transfer (in-country) of the same item, if the information remains accurate at the time of the additional reexport or transfer (in- country).

* * * * *

(2) Prior Consignee Statement. The requirements in this paragraph (d)(2) apply to each party using License Exception STA to export, reexport, or transfer (in-country), including reexporters and transferors of items previously received under License Exception STA. The exporter, reexporter, or transferor must obtain the following statement in writing from its consignee(s) prior to exporting, reexporting, or transferring (in-country) the item and must retain the statement in accordance with part 762 of the EAR. One statement may be used for multiple exports, reexports, or transfers (in- country) of the same items between the same parties so long as the party names, the description(s) of the item(s) and the ECCNs are correct. The exporter, reexporter, or transferor must maintain a log or other record (such as documents created in the ordinary course of business) that identifies each shipment made pursuant to this section and the specific consignee statement that is associated with each shipment. For purposes of this paragraph (d)(2), a log or other record is not required for intangible (i.e., electronic or in an otherwise intangible form) exports, reexports, or transfers (in-country) made under License Exception STA, but an exporter, reexporter, or transferor is required, prior to making any export, reexport, or transfer (in-country), to ensure that a prior consignee statement has been obtained pursuant to the requirements of this paragraph (d)(2). (See Note 1 to paragraph (d)(3) of this section for additional guidance on intangible exports, reexports, and transfers (in-country), including best practices). Paragraphs (d)(2)(i) through (vi) of this section are required for all transactions. In addition, paragraph (d)(2)(vii) is required for all transactions in ‘‘600 series’’ items and paragraph (viii) of this section is required for transactions in ‘‘600 series’’ items if the consignee is not the government of a country listed in Country Group A:5 (See supplement no. 1 to part 740 of the EAR). Paragraph (d)(2)(viii) is also required for transactions including 9×515 items.

[INSERT NAME(S) OF CONSIGNEE(S)]:

(i) Is aware that [INSERT GENERAL DESCRIPTION AND APPLICABLE ECCN(S) OF ITEMS TO BE SHIPPED (e.g., aircraft parts and components classified under ECCN 9A610)] will be shipped pursuant to License Exception Strategic Trade Authorization (STA) in § 740.20 of the United States Export Administration Regulations (15 CFR 740.20);

(ii) Has been informed of the ECCN(s) noted above by [INSERT NAME OF EXPORTER, REEXPORTER OR TRANSFEROR];

(iii) Understands that items shipped pursuant to License Exception STA may not subsequently be reexported pursuant to paragraphs (a) or (b) of License Exception APR (15 CFR 740.16(a) or (b)); (iv) Agrees to obtain a prior consignee statement when using License Exception STA for any reexport or transfer (in-country) of items previously received under License Exception STA; (v) Agrees not to export, reexport, or transfer these items to any destination, use or user prohibited by the United States’ Export Administration Regulations;

(vi) Agrees to provide copies of this document and all other export, reexport, or transfer records (i.e., the documents described in 15 CFR part 762) relevant to the items referenced in this statement to the U.S. Government as set forth in 15 CFR 762.7;

(vii) Understands that License Exception STA may be used to export, reexport, and transfer (in-country) ‘‘600 series’’ items to persons, whether non- governmental or governmental, only if they are in and, for natural persons, nationals of a country listed in Country Group A:5 (See supplement no. 1 to part 740 of the EAR) or the United States and if:

(A) The ultimate end user for such items is the armed forces, police, paramilitary, law enforcement, customs, correctional, fire, or a search and rescue agency of a government of one of the countries listed in Country Group A:5 or the United States Government;

(B) For the ‘‘development,’’ ‘‘production,’’ operation, installation, maintenance, repair, overhaul, or refurbishing of an item in one of the countries listed in Country Group A:5 or the United States that will be for one, or more, of the following purposes:

(1) Ultimately to be used by any such government agencies in one of the countries listed in Country Group A:5 or the United States Government; or

(2) Sent to a person in the United States and not for subsequent export under § 740.9(b)(1) (License Exception TMP for items moving in transit through the United States); or

(C) The United States Government has otherwise authorized the ultimate end use, the license or other authorization is in effect, and the consignee verifies in writing that such authorization exists and has provided the license or other approval identifier to the exporter, reexporter or transferor (as applicable).

(viii) Agrees to permit a U.S. Government end-use check with respect to the items.

[INSERT NAME(S) AND TITLE(S) OF PERSON(S) SIGNING THIS DOCUMENT, AND DATE(S) DOCUMENT IS SIGNED].

Note 1 to paragraph (d)(2): When multiple consignees who form a network engaged in a production process (or other type of collaborative activity, such as joint development) will be receiving items under License Exception STA, a single prior consignee statement for multiple consignees may be used for any item eligible for export, reexport, or transfer (in-country) under License Exception STA, provided all of the applicable requirements of License Exception STA are met, including those specified in paragraph (d)(2).

Note 2 to paragraph (d)(2): Country Group A:5 and A:6 government consignees are not required to sign or provide a prior consignee statement.

(3) * * *

Note 1 to paragraph (d)(3): While the exporter, reexporter, and transferor must furnish the applicable ECCN and obtain a consignee statement prior to export, reexport or transfer (in-country) made under License Exception STA in accordance with the requirements of paragraphs (d)(1) and (d)(2) of this section, intangible (i.e., electronic or in an otherwise intangible form) exports, reexports, and transfers (in-country) made under License Exception STA are not subject to the notification requirements of paragraph (d)(3) of this section. However, any export, reexport, or transfer (in-country) made under STA must stay within the scope of the original authorization.

* * * * *

Federal Register: https://www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/documents/regulations-docs/federal-register-notices/federal-register-2017/2163-82-fr-50511/file


Amendments to Implement United States Policy Toward Cuba

2018/02/08

Source: Federal Register

Effective November 9, 2017, The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) has amends the licensing policy for Cuba and portions of three license exceptions available for exports and reexports to Cuba: License Exceptions Gift Parcels and Humanitarian Donations (“GFT”), Consumer Communications Devices (“CCD”), and Support for the Cuban People (“SCP”).

Changes are as follows:

PART 740

Section 740.12 is amended by revising paragraph (a)(2)(v)(A) to read as follows:

Gift parcels and humanitarian donations (GFT).

(a) * * *

(2) * * *

(v) * * * (A) No gift parcel may be sent to any of the following officials of the Cuban government: Ministers and Vice-Ministers; members of the Council of State; members of the Council of Ministers; members and employees of the National Assembly of People’s Power; members of any provincial assembly; local sector chiefs of the Committees for the Defense of the Revolution; Director Generals and sub-Director Generals and higher of all Cuban ministries and state agencies; employees of the Ministry of the Interior (MININT); employees of the Ministry of Defense (MINFAR); secretaries and first secretaries of the Confederation of Labor of Cuba (CTC) and its component unions; chief editors, editors and deputy editors of Cuban state-run media organizations and programs, including newspapers, television, and radio; or members and employees of the Supreme Court (Tribuno Supremo Nacional).

* * * * *

Section 740.19 is amended by revising paragraph (c)(2)(i) to read as follows:

Consumer  Communications  Devices (CCD).

* * * * *

(c) * * *

(2) * * *

(i) Ineligible Cuban Government Officials. Ministers and Vice-Ministers; members of the Council of State; members of the Council of Ministers; members and employees of the National Assembly of People’s Power; members of any provincial assembly; local sector chiefs of the Committees for the Defense of the Revolution; Director Generals and sub-Director Generals and higher of all Cuban ministries and state agencies; employees of the Ministry of the Interior (MININT); employees of the Ministry of Defense (MINFAR); secretaries and first secretaries of the Confederation of Labor of Cuba (CTC) and its component unions; chief editors, editors and deputy editors of Cuban state-run media organizations and programs, including newspapers, television, and radio; or members and employees of the Supreme Court (Tribuno Supremo Nacional).

* * * * *

Section 740.21 is amended by:

  1. Revising paragraph (b)(1);
  2. Removing paragraphs (b)(2) and (3);
  3. Redesignating paragraph (b)(4) as new paragraph (b)(2); and
  4. Revising paragraph (d)(4)(ii) to read as follows:

Support for the Cuban People (SCP).

* * * * *

Start Printed Page 51986

(b) * * *

(1) Items for use by the Cuban private sector for private sector economic activities, except for items that would be used to:

(i) Primarily generate revenue for the state; or

(ii) Contribute to the operation of the state, including through the construction or renovation of state-owned buildings.

(2) Items sold directly to individuals in Cuba for their personal use or their immediate family’s personal use, other than officials identified in paragraphs (d)(4)(ii) or (iii) of this section.

* * * * *

(d) * * *

(4) * * *

(ii) Ministers and Vice-Ministers; members of the Council of State; members of the Council of Ministers; members and employees of the National Assembly of People’s Power; members of any provincial assembly; local sector chiefs of the Committees for the Defense of the Revolution; Director Generals and sub-Director Generals and higher of all Cuban ministries and state agencies; employees of the Ministry of the Interior (MININT); employees of the Ministry of Defense (MINFAR); secretaries and first secretaries of the Confederation of Labor of Cuba (CTC) and its component unions; chief editors, editors and deputy editors of Cuban state-run media organizations and programs, including newspapers, television, and radio; or members and employees of the Supreme Court (Tribuno Supremo Nacional); and

* * * * *

PART 746

Section 746.2 is amended by revising Note 2 to Paragraph (b)(3)(i) to read as follows:

Cuba.

* * * * *

(b) * * *

(3) * * *

(i) * * *

Note 2 to paragraph (b)(3)(i):

The policy of case-by-case review in this paragraph is intended to facilitate exports and reexports to meet the needs of the Cuban people. Accordingly, BIS generally will deny applications to export or reexport items for use by state-owned enterprises, agencies, and other organizations that primarily generate revenue for the state, including those engaged in tourism and those engaged in the extraction or production of minerals or other raw materials. Applications for export or reexport of items destined to the Cuban military, police, intelligence or security services also generally will be denied. Additionally, pursuant to section 3(a) of the National Security Presidential Memorandum on Strengthening the Policy of the United States Toward Cuba (NSPM), dated June 16, 2017, BIS generally will deny applications to export or reexport items for use by entities or subentities identified by the Department of State in the Federal Register or at https://www.state.gov/​e/​eb/​tfs/​spi/​cuba/​cubarestrictedlist/​index.htm, unless such transactions are determined to be consistent with sections 2 and 3(a)(iii) of the NSPM.

Federal Register: https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2017/11/09/2017-24448/amendments-to-implement-united-states-policy-toward-cuba


Treasury Publishes List of Countries Requiring Cooperation with an International Boycott

2018/02/08

Source: Federal Register

The Department of the Treasury has named the following countries as requiring or may requiring participation in, or cooperation with, an international boycott (within the meaning of section 999(b)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986).

  • Iraq
  • Kuwait
  • Lebanon
  • Libya
  • Qatar
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Syria
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Yemen

Federal Register: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2018-01-08/pdf/2018-00123.pdf


Tips on How to Resolve AES Fatal Errors

2018/02/08

Source: census@subscriptions.census.gov

When a shipment is filed to the AES, a system response message is generated and indicates whether the shipment has been accepted or rejected.  If the shipment is accepted, the AES filer receives an Internal Transaction Number (ITN) as confirmation.  However, if the shipment is rejected, a Fatal Error notification is received.

To help you resolve AES Fatal Errors, here are some tips on how to correct the most frequent errors that were generated in AES for this month.

Fatal Error Response Code:  107

  • Narrative: Country of Ultimate Destination Unknown
  • Reason: The Country of Ultimate Destination reported is not valid in AES.
  • Resolution: The Country of Ultimate Destination Code must be a valid ISO country code listed in the ‘Appendix C, ISO Country Codes’.  Verify the Country of Ultimate Destination, correct the shipment and resubmit.

Fatal Error Response Code:  628

  • Narrative: 1st Unit of Measure Code / Schedule B/HTS Mismatch
  • Reason: The Unit of Measure (1) reported does not match the Unit of Measure (1) required for the Schedule B/ HTS Number reported.
  • Resolution: The Unit of Measure (1) must match exactly the Unit of Measure (1) prescribed by the Schedule B/HTS Number reported.  See Appendix K – Units of Measure Codes Verify the Unit of Measure (1) required for the reported Schedule B/HTS Number, correct the shipment and resubmit.

For a complete list of Fatal Error Response Codes, their reasons, and resolutions, see Appendix A – Commodity Filing Response Messages.

It is important that AES filers correct Fatal Errors as soon as they are received in order to comply with the Foreign Trade Regulations.  These errors must be corrected prior to export for shipments filed predeparture and as soon as possible for shipments filed post departure but not later than five calendar days after departure.

For further information or questions, contact the U.S. Census Bureau’s Data Collection Branch.